We’re only two months into 2010, and climate change is shaping up to be one of the year’s big buzz topics. Our friends at NOAA have released a prototype of their new Climate Portal . The site offers everything from teaching resources to data visualizations to stories about how climate change is affecting people around the world. The Ocean Portal team is working closely with NOAA to produce a new section on climate change for the OP as well. We’ll release it in the next few weeks, so stay tuned. Climate change has made interesting headlines several other times this year, including: • Discovery...
This month, our friends at National Geographic are featuring Smithsonian's own bio-scavenger, Chris Meyer and his work in one of our favorite places: Moorea , French Polynesia. In a beautiful meld of art and science, photographer David Liittschwager traveled to Moorea and four other locations to snap portraits of all the life forms he could find in a cubic foot of space. On the reef near Moorea, he encountered an array of marine life from spectacular fire clams to bizarre polychaete worms. In all, more than a thousand individual organisms were photographed. "It was like finding little gems,"...
Happy New Year! We’ve officially hit mid-January, but there is still plenty of time to make those resolutions. If you’ve been putting it off or haven’t come up with a worthy resolution yet, why not resolve to do something to help the ocean? The ocean does so many things for us, surely we can return the favor by making small changes in our daily lives. Drawing a blank? Here are some idea to get started: Make the Connection. The first step in making a difference is learning about the ocean and how your actions have an impact. Keep reading or visit the Conservation pages of the Sant Ocean Hall...
We chose the tagline “You navigate” for the Ocean Portal in part because we really want you—the visitors to the site—to help steer the course. We hope you find your own intriguing paths to explore the OP as it exists now, but we’re also looking for input to help guide the site’s development in the months and years ahead. We’d like to call your attention to three ways you can easily speak your mind:
The race is on. We need to choose the next species and ecosystem to feature on the Ocean Portal, and we’re putting it to a vote. Does the charismatic (and threatened) polar bear deserve the spot or should the humble (and bizarre) sea cucumber finally be thrust into the limelight? Want to slosh with us through the salt marsh next or swim among the giant kelp? We need more votes to decide, and you could be the one to tip the scales. Cast your ballot for your favorite ocean species and ecosystem, and stay tuned for the results.
Tags: Ocean Portal
If you've found your way here, you've probably already seen the homepage of the Smithsonian Institution's brand new Ocean Portal (or OP, for short). We encourage you to spend some time exploring the OP and let us know what you think. This is an experiment and an invitation. It's our first attempt to really work closely with visitors to build an interactive web experience - not just a web site. And we invite you to participate in shaping the Portal as it grows. Sure, we have cool ocean things we want to show you, but we also want to know what you are curious about and what kinds of features...
In September, during the Sant Ocean Hall's first anniversary celebration, the Ocean Portal Team hit the museum floor to tell visitors about the OP and get some early feedback. Let's face it, we spend a lot of time at our computers, so we were very excited to meet people face-to-face. We asked visitors to vote on which ocean creature they'd like to see featured next on the portal: Chinook salmon, great white sharks, vent worms, or moon jellies. For those who couldn’t visit us in person, we also opened the voting up on our Facebook fan page . All the votes have been tallied, and the winner is...
On Friday, the OP Team had another great opportunity to talk face-to-face with some of the people that the Ocean Portal will serve: teachers. More than 4,000 teachers attended Smithsonian Teachers Night, and hundreds stopped by our table in the Sant Ocean Hall to chat with us and learn more about the OP. Teachers, your enthusiasm was infectious! We thought it was interesting how many of you noted the need for great pictures and video, as well as really cool, interesting, and even weird information that can help hook students. We hope you’ll find some of what you’re looking for in our Cool...