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Brian Skerry can be called many things – explorer, journalist, conservation advocate – but he is first and foremost a photographer. His journeys to capture amazing underwater photographs have taken him across the world’s...
The “Hyperbolic Crochet Coral Reef,” a unique exhibition and thought-provoking...
Wherever you live—and whatever your age or walk of life—there is something you...
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The ocean is so big that it can be easy to forget the microscopic beauty of the...

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“As we motored around Paulet Island in a Zodiac boat, these two curious penguins waddled across an iceberg to get a closer look at us.” -- Nature's Best photographer, Phillip Colla . See more beautiful ocean photos in our...
Harp seals are protected in the United States by the Marine Mammal...
The larger fish in this picture are called sweetlips ( Plectorhinchus )...

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With striking imagery from her book Smithsonian Ocean: Our Water, Our World, Deborah Cramer makes a powerful case for a...

The Ocean Blog

A fish made from pieces of plastic found on the beach swims above a bleached reef made of Styrofoam. While Angela Pozzi focuses her artwork on outreach about the harms of ocean plastic, she wants to...
A gentoo penguin ( Pygoscelis papua ) mother stands with her chick in Antarctica. When walking on land, gentoo penguins waddle with their long tails dragging behind them; but in the water, they are...
A still from The Last Boat Out , part of the 19th Annual Environmental Film Festival in the Nation's Capital.
“Upon returning from the reef after a night dive, I swam toward a bright reflection and came eye-to-eye with this beautiful, curious squid," said Charles Viggers, a Nature's Best photographer. Squids...
“Blue Planet” is a song on the Oceans Are Talking CD, produced by musician Sam Lardner. Listen to more inspirational songs for kids and adults, including “What Can I Do?” “Humanatee,” and “Pteropods...
A cameraman navigates a smack of sea nettles ( Chrysaora fuscescens ) in Monterey Bay. A group of jellies is known as a "smack."
“Manta rays sometimes approach divers; an up-close encounter with such a huge, peaceful animal is unforgettable!” -- Nature's Best photographer, Deborah Smrekar. See more beautiful ocean photos in...
Editor's Note: These images and more can be seen at Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History in Washington, D.C., as a part of the larger exhibit " Portraits of Planet Ocean: The Photography...
What can students do to help the ocean? It turns out, a lot! These students from Hawaii are among dozens from the U.S. and Mexico who are developing action plans on ocean and climate-related issues...
A few years ago, I was in New Zealand photographing a story about the value of marine reserves (a type of marine protected area ). My last location was a place called the Poor Knights Islands , a...
Named for the radiant blue color on its back and sides, the blue shark ( Prionace glauca ) traverses the world’s temperate and tropical seas. Known for traveling great distances and being a swift...
Henry the Giant Fish was Angela's first idea for the Washed Ashore project. "If I make a giant bright fish, everyone will get their picture taken in front of it," she says—and, in the process, they'...
What would you do if you came face to face with a shark ? Brian Skerry lives for these moments and is ready with his camera. Here he is seen photographing a large tiger shark on the seafloor near the...
Whether trash or treasures, natural objects or man-made castaways, things that wash up on the shoreline can be fascinating. A keen eye while strolling the beach can uncover hidden beauties like this...
A close-up of Lidia the Seal—like the view you'd get if you approach the sculpture in real life—shows the gory details of the everyday objects that wash up on the beach. Have you thrown out any...
Dampier is credited with helping to rescue Alexander Selkirk, the privateer who inspired the Robinson Crusoe story.
With striking imagery from her book Smithsonian Ocean: Our Water, Our World, Deborah Cramer makes a powerful case for a basic truth about the ocean: we need the sea, and now the sea needs us.
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