Ocean Collaborators

Schooling fish know that working together is better for everyone. The same is true on the Ocean Portal, where we are gathering a group of outstanding organizations in the fields of marine science, education, media, conservation, and other areas. By pooling our expertise and top assets, we can provide a richer experience than any one of us could alone. Get to know each organization by exploring their contributions on the OP and visiting their websites.

Featured Collaborators

Scripps Institution of Oceanography, at University of California, San Diego, is one of the oldest, largest and most important centers for global science research and education in the world. The National Research Council has ranked Scripps first in faculty quality among oceanography programs nationwide. Now in its second century of discovery, the scientific scope of the institution has grown to include biological, physical, chemical, geological, geophysical and atmospheric studies of the earth as a system. Hundreds of research programs covering a wide range of scientific areas are under way today in 65 countries. The institution has a staff of about 1,300, and annual expenditures of approximately $155 million from federal, state and private sources. Scripps operates one of the largest U.S. academic fleets with four oceanographic research ships and one research platform for worldwide exploration.

Laetitia Plaisance is a marine biologist who received her doctor of philosophy degree from the university of Perpignan in France. She has since been studying coral reefs in many locations around the world. As a research scientist at the National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution, she specialized in the study of coral reef biodiversity. She has developed, as part of the international Census of Marine life project, new methods to assess and monitor this extraordinary and threatened diversity. In collaboration with the Australian Institute of Marine Science she is now exploring how ocean acidification will impact coral reef biodiversity in the future and the ecological consequences for the entire ecosystem.

ARKive is a unique global initiative, gathering together the best films, photographs and audio recordings of the world's threatened animals, plants and fungi into one centralized digital library. Films and photographs are a powerful means of building environmental awareness - they can bring a scientific name to life, show what a species looks like and why it is special. Continued habitat destruction and the rise in extinction rates also mean that for many species, films and photographs may soon be all that remains. They are, therefore, important historical and scientific records of the species they depict. ARKive is leading the 'virtual' conservation effort by creating comprehensive and enduring multimedia species profiles, complementing other species information datasets, and making a key resource available for scientists, conservationists, educators and the general public. These important audio-visual records are being preserved and maintained for the benefit of future generations and are freely available at www.arkive.org.

The Pew Charitable Trusts is driven by the power of knowledge to solve today's most challenging problems. Pew applies a rigorous, analytical approach to improve public policy, inform the public and stimulate civic life. We partner with a diverse range of donors, public and private organizations and concerned citizens who share our commitment to fact-based solutions and goal-driven investments to improve society. www.pewtrusts.org

Pew is a major force in educating the public and policy makers about the causes, consequences and solutions to environmental problems. We actively promote strong conservation policies in the United States and internationally. Pew applies a range of tools in pursuit of practical, meaningful solutions-including applied science, public education, sophisticated media and communications, and policy advocacy.

Our marine work is aimed at preserving the biological integrity of marine ecosystems and primarily focuses on efforts to curb overfishing, reduce bycatch and prevent the destruction of marine habitat. Learn more at http://www.pewtrusts.org/our_work_category.aspx?id=126.

The Census of Marine Life is a global network of researchers in 80+ nations engaged in a ten-year scientific initiative to assess and explain the diversity, distribution and abundance of marine life in the world’s oceans - past, present and future. Conducting research in under-explored and well-studied habitats alike, in both coastal and deep waters, the Census is identifying new organisms, collecting new information on ocean life, analyzing historical documents, and modeling future ecosystems. This will enable scientists to compare what once lived in the oceans to what lives there now, and to project what will live there in the future. The world's first comprehensive Census of Marine Life - past, present, and future - was released in 2010.

Smithsonian Contributors

Patricia Newman and Annie Crawley joined scientists on the SEAPLEX expedition with Project Kaisei to The North Pacific Gyre, more commonly known as the Great Pacific Garbage Patch, and together released Plastic Ahoy! Investigating the Great Pacific Garbage Patch about three scientists on the expedition. Plastic, Ahoy! Investigating the Great Pacific Garbage Patch is a Junior Library Guild Selection, a finalist for the AAAS Science Books and Film prize, a Nerdy Book Club Award winner, and an NSTA-recommended book. Take a deep dive and explore.

Patricia Newman writes fiction and nonfiction books and magazine articles for children. She is a frequent speaker at schools and libraries. Visit her at www.patriciamnewman.com.

Annie Crawley specializes in the underwater realm as an underwater photographer, filmmaker, educator and ocean advocate. Traveling as a scuba diving instructor around the world with a camera in hand, she shares the ocean with you. She has traveled and documented expeditions around the world. Visit her at www.AnnieCrawley.com.

Trina Bayard is the Director of Bird Conservation at Washington Audubon. In addition to her formative experiences exploring Puget Sound tide-pools and Cascade mountain meadows, Trina's path to Audubon includes more than ten years of experience on a broad range of plant and wildlife studies in eastern Oregon, coastal California and coastal Connecticut including her doctoral research on Saltmarsh Sparrows. She has worked in the public and private sectors and has studied and traveled in East Africa and Southeast Asia. She holds a Ph.D in Ecology from the University of Connecticut, and earned an undergraduate degree in biology from Lewis & Clark College.
Dr. Nancy Knowlton is the Sant Chair for Marine Science at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History and a scientific leader of the Census of Marine Life. She wrote the book, Citizens of the Sea, to celebrate the ten years of the Census. She founded the Center for Marine Biodiversity and Conservation at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography of the University of California, San Diego. Knowlton has devoted her life to studying, celebrating, and striving to protect the multitude of life-forms that call the sea home. She lives with her family in Washington, D.C.
Amanda Feuerstein’s ocean education began at age five at Compo Beach on the Long Island Sound where tide pools were her classroom. In later years she received a more formal education at Yale University where she got her Bachelors of Science in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology. She also spent four years studying the invertebrate zoology collections at the Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History and focused on the relationship between sea turtles and the barnacles that call them home. You can now find her working with Nancy Knowlton as a program coordinator in the office of the Sant Chair for Marine Science.

 

Patrick Schwing is a postdoctoral research associate at the University of South Florida, College of Marine Science. His research focuses on determining human impacts on coastal and marine sedimentary depositional environments. He received his bachelors degree in marine science from Eckerd College in 2006 and his Ph.D. in chemical oceanography from the USF, College of Marine Science in 2011. He is currently working with two groups affiliated with the Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative (GOMRI) to determine the long-term effects of the Deepwater Horizon Blowout in 2010.