Ocean Collaborators

Schooling fish know that working together is better for everyone. The same is true on the Ocean Portal, where we are gathering a group of outstanding organizations in the fields of marine science, education, media, conservation, and other areas. By pooling our expertise and top assets, we can provide a richer experience than any one of us could alone. Get to know each organization by exploring their contributions on the OP and visiting their websites.

Featured Collaborators

NOAA is an agency that enriches life through science. Their reach goes from the surface of the sun to the depths of the ocean floor as they work to keep citizens informed of the changing environment around them.

From daily weather forecasts, severe storm warnings and climate monitoring to fisheries management, coastal restoration and supporting marine commerce, NOAA's products and services support economic vitality and affect more than one-third of America's gross domestic product. NOAA's dedicated scientists use cutting-edge research and high-tech instrumentation to provide citizens, planners, emergency managers and other decision makers with reliable information they need when they need it.

NOAA's roots date back to 1807, when the Nation's first scientific agency, the Survey of the Coast, was established. Since then, NOAA has evolved to meet the needs of a changing country. NOAA maintains a presence in every state and has emerged as an international leader on scientific and environmental matters.

The Encyclopedia of Life (EOL) was established to make comprehensive, authenticated information about the world’s biodiversity freely available over the Internet. Encyclopedia of Life’s portal includes hundreds of thousands of authenticated species pages, 1.4 million base pages and links to 13 million pages of digitized biodiversity literature. The features available on the EOL portal make participation possible by everyone. Users including students, scientists and members of the public can contribute photos and videos via the EOL Flickr Group, apply tags to images and provide comments on the content.

The EOL provides an engaging and informative learning platform where students and others can work together to help build this global resource and learn about biological diversity worldwide.

The ocean is essential to all life on Earth and Ocean Conservancy is the world's oldest and largest conservation organization dedicated solely to protecting this life support system. We're starting a sea change for generations to come.

EarthEcho International empowers youth to take action that protects and restores our water planet. The organization was founded by Philippe and Alexandra Cousteau in honor of their father Philippe Cousteau Sr., son of Jacques Yves Cousteau. EarthEcho International is a nonprofit organization whose mission is to empower youth to take action that protects and restores our water planet. EarthEcho International believes that if we truly want to save our water planet, then we must foster tomorrow’s leaders by equipping them with the knowledge, skills, and tools to do. To that end, EarthEcho International engages youth to bring about global change by taking action in their communities, helping them to understand the vital connections between their lives and today's critical ocean and fresh water issues. Our programs leverage cutting-edge technology and the highest quality educational content to empower youth to both understand the conservation issues facing the environment and then take action through service-learning to solve them. The organization was founded by siblings Philippe and Alexandra Cousteau in honor of their father Philippe Cousteau Sr., famous son of the legendary explorer Jacques Yves Cousteau.

The Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) is dedicated to research and education to advance understanding of the ocean and its interaction with the Earth system, and to communicating this understanding for the benefit of society.

Smithsonian Contributors

Caroline is a PhD student, and has been working in Dr. Ian MacDonald’s lab at Florida State University since January, 2012. She is interested in quantifying the volume and release rate of bubbles from natural hydrocarbon seeps. She does this using image processing techniques on the video data collected with the VTLC (video time lapse camera). She is also interested in describing the dynamic variability of natural seeps, and understanding the migration pathways of the oil and gas from sub-bottom reservoirs to the sea floor. Caroline enjoys spending time out at sea, setting up and deploying the camera system and making sure it is positioned in the right spot to get optimal video footage of the bubbles. She also likes working in the lab to fix/make pieces of the camera system, which includes assembling the frame, soldering wires, and coming up with creative ways to mount the camera on different structures. This makes up for the many hours spent behind the computer to analyze the data.

Dr. Karen Osborn is the Curator of Marine Invertebrates at the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History and studies the evolution of life in the deep, open ocean. Many animals that live in this largest of the earth's habitats are very bizarre and dramatically different from their closest relatives.  Most animal groups have representatives living in the open ocean and learning about the differences in the way these animals live compared to how their relatives in shallow water or on the sea floor live, tells us a lot about how this environment changes and shapes the many animals that survive there.  

Karen came to the Smithsonian after working at the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI) and Scripps Institution of Oceanography. She spends a lot of time at sea using remotely operated vehicles to explore and study the deep, open ocean. 

Elizabeth Bevan is the Coastal Communities Specialist for the National Sea Grant Office.  She is a recipient of the 2014 John A. Knauss Marine Policy Fellowship.

Elizabeth is a Ph.D. student at the University of Alabama at Birmingham, evaluating the impact of global climate change on reproduction in the endangered Kemp’s ridley sea turtle.  Elizabeth received her B.S. in marine biology from Florida International University, her M.S in biology at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. Prior to embarking upon her PhD studies, Elizabeth originally “wet her feet” through a variety of marine activities in South Florida, including marine educational outreach, biological monitoring, and sea turtle research.

Dr. Carole Baldwin is a well-respected authority on marine biology, especially tropical-marine and deep-sea fishes. She grew up in coastal South Carolina and studied at James Madison University, the College of Charleston, and the College of William and Mary. She has published over five dozen scientific articles, and her work includes the discovery of new species of fishes in Belize, Tobago, Cook Islands, Australia, El Salvador and the Galápagos Islands.

Dr. Baldwin is currently on the Board of Directors of the National Aquarium, D.C. Venue. She has devoted much time to sharing her experiences as a marine biologist with students and the general public and is a role model for young girls considering careers in science. Dr. Baldwin is senior author of One Fish, Two Fish, Crawfish, Bluefish -- The Smithsonian Sustainable Seafood Cookbook, which features educational information and recipes for U.S. seafood species fished or farmed in an environmentally sound manner. Most recently, Dr. Baldwin served as a curator of the Sant Ocean Hall at Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History where she holds the position of Research Zoologist in the Division of Fishes.

The Smithsonian Marine Science Network is a unique array of laboratories and research vessels that spans the latitudinal gradient of the western Atlantic and crosses the isthmus of Panama. Research focus is on the Chesapeake Bay, Indian River Lagoon, Mesoamerican Barrier Reef, and the Caribbean and Pacific coasts of Panama.

The Smithsonian Marine Science Symposium contained over 70 oral and poster presentations by Smithsonian scholars and collaborators and represented the first major dissemination of marine research results since the establishment of the Marine Science Network (MSN) in 1998. The MSN operates a unique array of laboratories and research vessels that spans the latitudinal gradient of the western Atlantic (Chesapeake Bay, Indian River Lagoon, Mesoamerican Barrier Reef and Panamanian Coast) and crosses the isthmus of Panama. The Network is dedicated to understanding the rich biodiversity and complex ecosystem dynamics that sustain coastal processes and productivity. We study evolutionary, ecological, and environmental change in the ocean’s coastal zones, increasing scientific knowledge of these environments, and improving society’s appreciation of the ocean’s effect on our lives. Coastal environments are of immense economic and environmental importance and comprise 95% of the ocean’s fisheries. Our coasts are the most densely populated and fastest growing communities in the U.S. The MSN ensures integrated support of “Discovering and Understanding Life’s Diversity,” a core Smithsonian scientific mission. MSN goals are to ensure that the whole of the integrated Network is larger than the sum of its parts leading to enhanced productivity through collaborative and comparative research, marine infrastructure development and support, professional training and outreach, and effective allocation of resources.