Today's Catch

May 16, 2014
Credit:

From Verrill, A.E., 1882, Report on the Cephalopods of the Northeastern Coast of America

This 1874 photo of a squid draped over a bathtub was the first ever taken of a giant squid. It belonged to the Reverend Moses Harvey of Newfoundland. More about the giant squid can be found in the Giant Squid section .Read more
May 15, 2014
Credit:

Bryce Flynn/Nature’s Best Photography

“This humpback uses its lower jaw to strain fish off the water’s surface as sea birds snatch their own meals right out of the whale’s open mouth.” -- Nature's Best photographer, Bryce Flynn. See more beautiful ocean photos in our slideshow of winners from the 2010 Nature's Best Ocean Views photo contest.Read more
May 14, 2014
Credit:

L. Madin, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (www.cmarz.org)

This colony of Rosacea may look like a single jellyfish, but it is actually a large group of smaller siphonophores clustered and living together. In fact, the zooids (individual siphonophores living in the colony) cannot survive on their own. This specimen was photographed by the Census of Marine Zooplankton , a project of the Census of Marine Life , in the Sargasso Sea in April 2006. A Rosacea...Read more
May 13, 2014
Credit:

Tobias Friedrich/Nature's Best Photography

Gobies make up the largest family ( Gobiidae ) of fishes in the world, with over 2,000 species. In this large family you can also find the smallest fish. The gobies in this photo are about one inch long (2.5 cm), and most in the family are less than four inches. Because of their small size gobies must work to evade their many predators, often through burrowing or special mutualistic relationships...Read more
May 12, 2014
Credit:Photo courtesy of CARTHE
Researchers launch one-meter-tall plastic drifters into the Gulf of Mexico in 2012. Over 300 of these drifters were released and their location information was sent to researchers every five minutes through GPS satellite. This project from the Consortium for Advanced Research on Transport of Hydrocarbon in the Environment, or CARTHE, called the Grand LAgrangian Deployment (GLAD) received 5.7...Read more
May 9, 2014
Credit:

Artie Copleman, Flickr

'Austral' or southern breeders, Great Shearwaters ( Ardenna gravis ) migrate from breeding islands far to the south in the Atlantic before traveling to the Northern Atlantic to feed. This trip is 6,000 miles each way and, if they're lucky, great shearwaters will complete this round trip every year for a 60-year lifetime. See photos and read more about seabird migration.Read more
May 8, 2014
Credit:

Jeff Yonover/Nature's Best Photography

These beautiful pink and yellow shimmering fish ( Parapriacanthus ransonneti ) live in large groups among corals and in caves where they feed on zooplankton at night. “Golden sweepers form schools in reef crevices and caves and among coral heads. The technique I employed to make this image was a long exposure and rear curtain synchronization combined with a circular rotation of the camera during...Read more
May 7, 2014
Credit:

© Lollo Enstad/San Diego Natural History Museum

Two fossilized teeth from a megalodon ( Carcharodon megalodon ) dating back more than 20 million years. Their teeth can reach a diagonal length of seven inches! The ancestry of great white sharks has long been debated, but by looking closer at shark teeth scientists know that the giant megatooth shark was not an ancestor of the great white shark. More about the great white shark can be found in...Read more
May 6, 2014
Credit:

Mark J. A. Vermeij

Grey reef sharks ( Carcharhinus amblyrhynchos ) are among the most versatile and tough predators on a Pacific coral reef, but they are also among the most vulnerable species, as they are threatened by wasteful fishing practices like shark finning . They're also very sensitive to human presence, fleeing reefs when people settle along the coasts and preferring more isolated areas. Where you can...Read more
May 5, 2014
Credit:

Howard J. Spero/University of California, Davis

This foraminifera was collected as it floated about 3 meters below the surface off the coast of Puerto Rico. The central dark area is the shell surrounded by spines. The tiny yellow dots are symbiotic algae, which live in the protoplasm of the host organism. When the foraminifer dies, the spines fall off and only the shell is preserved in the fossil record. Shell building animals like forams will...Read more

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