Today's Catch

Mar 10, 2014
Credit:

©2003 MBARI

Riftia tubeworm ( Riftia pachyptila ) colonies grow where hot, mineral-laden water flows out of the seafloor in undersea hot springs—such as the Guymas Basin of the Gulf of California at 2,000 meters (6562 feet), where MBARI took this photo. As volcanic activity deep below the seafloor changes, sometimes these hot springs stop flowing. In this case, the entire worm colony may die off. But new hot...Read more
Mar 6, 2014
Credit:

© Brian Skerry, www.brianskerry.com

The shortfin mako shark ( Isurus oxyrinchus) is found offshore in tropical and warm temperate waters of all oceans, but has been known to travel to cooler waters at times. It is very strong and the fastest known species of shark, reaching moving speeds of 31 mph (50 kph) with bursts up to 46 mph! These qualities make the shortfin mako a prized catch among recreational fisherman. The mako is also...Read more
Mar 5, 2014
Credit:

Stacy Jupiter

Giant clams are one of the many wonders of coral reefs. They can grow up to five feet wide, weigh over 400 pounds, and live for 100 years! They power all that bulk by filter feeding microbes and particles from the water, siphoning hundreds of gallons of water per day. Like corals, they also have a symbiotic relationship with photosynthetic algae called zooxanthellae that live in the fleshy part...Read more
Mar 4, 2014
Credit:

David Shale/MAR-ECO, Census of Marine Life

This beautiful jewel squid ( Histioteuthis bonnellii ) can be found swimming above the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, at depths of 500-2,000 meters (1,640-6,562 feet). The “jewels” covering the body are bioluminescent photophores. But these squids can't bargain for their lives with those jewels: they have been found in the stomachs of sperm whales, swordfish and sharks.Read more
Mar 3, 2014
Credit:

Mark Rosenstein, Flickr

The toothy goby or common ghost goby ( Pleurosicya mossambica ) lives among soft corals and sponges in the Indo-Pacific ocean. The relationship it has with its host is commensal , which means the goby benefits from the protection and habitat in the corals, but the coral doesn't get hurt or benefit from the relationship. Many of the other 2000 or so species of gobies form such symbiotic...Read more
Feb 28, 2014
Credit:

Chuck Savall

Munch, munch. The queen parrotfish ( Scarus vetula ) scrapes algae from Caribbean coral reefs with its parrot-like beak. While feeding, hard stone and coral inevitably get mixed into its lunch, which in turn gets ground up by the fish and deposited back into the ecosystem as sand. This fish is an adult male. But when young, parrotfish have the ability to change sex, depending on the population’s...Read more
Feb 26, 2014
Credit:

Smithsonian Institution

Researchers with the Smithsonian's Deep Reef Observation Project (DROP) collected this sea toad, Chaunax pictus , off the coast of Honduras in 2011. The team is trying to collect sea toads from around the Caribbean to better understand the group's genetic diversity and distribution. You can see videos and read about the DROP team's other explorations on the " Summer in a Sub " blog series.Read more
Feb 25, 2014
Credit:

Courtesy of Ian Joughlin

It’s confirmed: both Antarctica and Greenland are losing ice —around 350 billion tons each year—and, as a result, sea level has risen 11.1 millimeters worldwide since 1992. This photo shows a summertime channel created by the flow of melted ice, which ultimately carries the water away from the glacier to the sea. It's not easy to measure melting ice. But by using data from 10 satellite missions,...Read more
Feb 24, 2014
Credit:

Hans Hillewaert, WoRMS for SMEBD

Like other cephalopods, the common cuttlefish ( Sepia officials ) is no dummy. But while octopuses are quick to learn manual tasks like opening jars, cuttlefish have a different skillset: the social. Unlike other cephalopod species, cuttlefish are very social and interact with each other frequently, like humans, and have sophisticated communication ability. Read more about cephalopod intelligence...Read more
Feb 21, 2014
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NOAA, Alaska Fisheries Science Center

The ghoulish “blob sculpin” ( Psychrolutes phrictus ) , a deepwater fish found off the Pacific coast of the U.S. from the Bering Sea to Southern California, can grow to about 70 cm (more than two feet) in length and eats small invertebrates. See more bizarre-looking ocean life in a slideshow of the scariest monsters of the deep-sea and learn more about the deep ocean in the Deep Ocean Exploration...Read more

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