Today's Catch

Jan 5, 2016
Credit:

Smithsonian Institution

Starksia blennies, small fish with elongated bodies, generally native to shallow to moderately deep rock and coral reefs in the western Atlantic and eastern Pacific oceans, have been well-studied for more than 100 years. It would have been reasonable to assume that there was little about the group left to discover. Using modern genetic analysis combined with traditional examination of morphology...Read more
Jan 4, 2016
Credit:Ernst Stewart
Known to many simply as “shark girl,” Madison Stewart is an inspiring young woman with a passion to protect the creatures most people fear: sharks. S he’s been diving with sharks since the age of twelve. Here she is feeding a group of Caribbean reef sharks. Now 20, Madison has made it her life’s mission to safeguard the creatures and the reefs she loves. Read more in her blog post.Read more
Dec 30, 2015
Credit:

Flickr user PacificKlaus

Like other sea snakes , the turtle-headed sea snake ( Emydocephalus annulatus ) has fangs and venom. But its venom is weak so, instead of defending with a bite, the species tends to react to danger by swimming back to a crack or crevice to hide. For food, the sea snake sneaks around coral reefs looking for fish eggs attached to coral or rocks. It then uses a large tooth-like scale on each side of...Read more
Dec 28, 2015
Credit:

Marsh Youngbluth/MAR-ECO, Census of Marine Life

Like this ctenophore ( Aulococtena acuminata ), many animals that live in the midwater zone are red—making them almost invisible in the dim blue light that filters down from the sea surface. This small comb jelly snares prey with its two short tentacles. Read m ore about the deep sea and comb jellies .Read more
Dec 23, 2015
Credit:

Flickr User Sushi_Girl1995

These candy cane snapping shrimp ( Alpheus randalli ) have a pretty nice set up. They share their living space with goby fish, helping the fish dig and maintain the burrow that they share in the seafloor. In turn the small, and mostly blind, shrimp (seen in this photo below the goby) get protection from predators in the form of alerts from the goby and a place to call home.Read more
Dec 22, 2015
Credit:

Jennifer Strotman, Collections Program

I want snack, so give me cookie! The cookie cutter shark ( Isistius brasiliensis ) is as fearless as they come! This small, 20-inch shark can take on giants like whales and larger sharks, and have even been known to mistakenly try to bite submarines. They dwell in the deep warm ocean and come closer to the surface as the sun sets to grab a quick snack off their unsuspecting prey. Cookie cutter...Read more
Dec 21, 2015
Credit:

Flickr User Len Burgess

The jingle shell ( Anomia simplex ) is a common bivalve found on the Atlantic coast of North America, amongst the more commonly known clams and oysters. As with oysters, the lower shell is glued to a hard surface. Even after the mollusk is dead, the shell keeps its beautiful and shiny exterior. The thin, translucent shells are often used in jewelry, and when strung together can sound like bells,...Read more
Dec 18, 2015
Credit:

Copyright © Alexander Semenov

This is a tree topper unlike any other! Reminiscent of a freshly made snow angel, these pteropods are actually shell-less sea snails ( Clione limacina ). Unlike the typical snail, they flap their adapted foot ‘wings’ to get around in the water column. They are extremely small, with the largest species reaching only 5 centimeters long. Sea angels' mostly eat their relatives, the sea butterflies ,...Read more
Dec 16, 2015
Follow a journey with satellite tags placed on bull sharks and tarpon. Both of these large predatory fish are found in coastal in-shore ecosystems and the two species have similar diets. If given the opportunity, bull sharks will catch and consume tarpon. However, it remains unknown if tarpon adjust their movements to avoid being killed by the sharks. Using the information gained by the satellite...Read more
Dec 15, 2015
Credit:

Dietmar Temps (Flickr)

A parent Magellanic penguin ( Spheniscus magellanicus ) sits with its big chick. Magellanic penguins live in South America, breeding in colonies along the coasts of Chile, Argentina and the Falkland Islands, and some migrate north to Brazil. Parents typically lay two eggs under a bush or in a burrow, taking turns swimming out to sea to catch food for their chicks. But the largest colony in the...Read more

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