Today's Catch

Apr 28, 2015
Credit:

Steve Garvie, Flickr

An Atlantic puffin ( Fratercula arctica ) carries many sandlances ( Ammodytidae ) in its mouth to take back to its hungry chick. Puffins have spiny tongues that, pressed against the roof of their mouths, help to hold ten or more fish at once without losing any along the way. The two parents of a single chick take turns bringing food back to the nest. It's possible to learn what kinds of fish are...Read more
Apr 27, 2015
Credit:

Owen Sherwood

Ultraviolet light illuminates the growth rings in a cross-section of a 44-year-old deep-sea coral ( Primnoa resedaeformis ) collected off the coast of Newfoundland at about 1,300 feet (400 meters). Similar to tree trunks, cross-sections reveal coral-growth rings that can be used to determine their age—and information about climate . Because coral growth depends on temperature, sunlight, and...Read more
Apr 24, 2015
Credit:

Gustavo Almada (Flickr

Every breeding season, some 400,000 Magellanic penguins ( Spheniscus magellanicus ) come to Punta Tombo, Argentina to nest on the shore. They typically lay two eggs in a burrow or under a bush, and the parents take turns watching the egg or chick and headng out to sea to catch food. In recent years, the parents have had to go farther to catch food that has moved offshore as ocean waters warm from...Read more
Apr 22, 2015
The small vaquita ( Phocoena sinus ), a type of porpoise, usually only reaches lengths of 5 feet (1.5 meters). They are only found in the Northern part of the Gulf of California off the coast of Mexico, and their population size is estimated to be less than 600 animals. This makes them the most endangered of the marine mammals. But estimating their numbers is a difficult task considering their...Read more
Apr 21, 2015
Credit:

Lori Morris, St. Johns River Water Management District

Johnson's seagrass ( Halophila johnsonii ) is the lone ocean plant species listed under the Endangered Species Act. Its flowing green stalks play an important role in coastal ecosystems, where they act as nursery grounds for small larval fish. They are also food for the endangered West Indian manatee and green sea turtle. See more endangered ocean species in our slideshow .Read more
Apr 20, 2015
Credit:

© Brian Skerry, www.brianskerry.com

A male great hammerhead shark swims in the Bahamas at sunset. Scientists debate the purpose behind these sharks' hammer-shaped heads. A commonly accepted theory is that the shape allows the shark to scan a wider area of the ocean through its sensory organs . Of the eight species of hammerheads, the great hammerhead shark ( Sphyrna mokarran ) is the largest, reaching a maximum length of 20 feet...Read more
Apr 17, 2015
Credit:

© David Shale

This aptly named fish ( Anoplogaster cornuta ) has long, menacing fangs, but the adult fish is small, reaching only about 6 inches (17 cm) in length. It's teeth are the largest in the ocean in proportion to body size, and are so long that the fangtooth has an adaptation so that it can close its mouth! Special pouches on the roof of its mouth prevent the teeth from piercing the fish's brain when...Read more
Apr 16, 2015
Credit:

Amanda Feuerstein

Is it lights out for corals once they have experienced a bleaching event? Not necessarily. This photo shows a coral reef near Bocas del Toro, Panama that is in the process of recovering from a mass bleaching event that occurred in the summer of 2010. The tops contain some bleaching, but the sides look healthy. Warm waters had caused the corals to lose their zooxanthellae, the single-celled algae...Read more
Apr 15, 2015
Credit:

Mary Elizabeth Miller, Dauphin Island Sea Lab

A “pink meanie” jellyfish ( Drymonema larsoni )—a species found in the Gulf of Mexico and the Caribbean—feeds on a moon jelly ( Aurelia ). Dr. Keith Bayha from the Dauphin Island Sea Lab and Dr. Michael Dawson from the University of California, Merced recently discovered that the pink meanie represents not only a new species, but an entirely new family of jellyfish. Learn more about jellyfish...Read more
Apr 13, 2015
Credit:

Eliott Norse, Marine Conservation Biology Institute/Marine Photobank

Bycatch, or accidentally caught species, can make up a very high percentage of the haul in shrimp trawl nets. However, some of these “trash” species are now being used, rather than discarded, and new technologies can reduce the catch of non-target species. Learn more in our featured story about Sustainable Seafood .Read more

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