Today's Catch

Two bright orange anemonefish poke their heads between anemone tentacles.

Clownfish in their Host Anemone

Two bright orange anemonefish ( Amphiprion ocellaris ) poke their heads between anemone tentacles. Anemonefish are able to swim amongst the stinging tentacles without getting stung — but no one knows exactly sure how. One dominant theory explains...
A beluga whale

Baby Beluga

Beluga whales are naturally vocal animals. They are often called “ canaries of the sea ” thanks to their wide repertoire of sounds such as whistles, squeals, moos, chirps, and clicks. Some researchers believe they even found a beluga that tried to...
A photo of a candy basslet, an orange and yellow-striped fish.

Candy Basslet

A candy basslet ( Liopropoma carmabi ) was one of the specimens Smithsonian scientists collected from the deep reefs of Curaçao on a 2011 research trip in the southern Caribbean. Learn more about the scientists' research on the Summer in Sub Blog
A pearly razorfish

Pearly Razorfish

The pearly razorfish’s name may be slightly misleading since it is neither as rare as a pearl nor as dangerous as a razor. It is a common fish that tends to live in clear shallow areas near seagrass beds and coral reefs, where it collects coral...

Blue-Green Antarctic Glacier

Looking through this iceberg's reflection in the Antarctic water, you can see the iceberg below the surface—some 90% of its total volume. Icebergs are pieces of freshwater ice broken off of glaciers or ice shelves, left to float across the sea. Many...

Map of Shark Protections Through Time

Sharks face many threats from people, including extreme overfishing driven by high prices for their fins, and being caught by mistake in nets and on longlines. While there is still much work to be done to conserve sharks, take a moment to recognize...

Teeth and Jaw of an Ancient Shark

This well-preserved fossil is the only intact partial skull ever found of a white shark that lived about 6.5 million years ago called Carcharodon hubbelli . The fossil jaw contains 222 teeth, some in rows up to six teeth deep, and may provide...
The dwarf lantern shark sits in a human hand.

Dwarf Lantern Shark

The smallest shark, a dwarf lantern shark ( Etmopterus perryi ) is smaller than a human hand. It's rarely seen and little is known about it, having only been observed a few times off the northern tip of South America at depths between 283–439 meters...

Shark Embryo

Sharks have young in three different ways. After internal fertilization, some species lay a thick egg case that encloses the shark embryo (seen in the photo here). Most species are ovoviviparous, which means that the shark hatches and develops...
Shark Sizes: Whale Shark 46 feet, Basking Shark 33 feet, Great White Shark 23 feet, Megamouth Shark 15 feet, Nurse Shark 13 feet, Mako Shark 8 feet, Blacktip Reef Shark 6.5 feet, Bonnethead Shark 3.4 feet, Dwaf Lantern Shark 6 inches

What is the Biggest Shark? A Chart Shows the Diversity of Shark Sizes

Sharks come in all sizes. The largest is the whale shark , which has been known to get as large as 18 meters (60 feet). The smallest fits in your hand. And the great white shark is somewhere in the middle. See photos and learn more about the wide...

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