Today's Catch

Dec 22, 2015
Credit:

Jennifer Strotman, Collections Program

I want snack, so give me cookie! The cookie cutter shark ( Isistius brasiliensis ) is as fearless as they come! This small, 20-inch shark can take on giants like whales and larger sharks, and have even been known to mistakenly try to bite submarines. They dwell in the deep warm ocean and come closer to the surface as the sun sets to grab a quick snack off their unsuspecting prey. Cookie cutter...Read more
Dec 21, 2015
Credit:

Flickr User Len Burgess

The jingle shell ( Anomia simplex ) is a common bivalve found on the Atlantic coast of North America, amongst the more commonly known clams and oysters. As with oysters, the lower shell is glued to a hard surface. Even after the mollusk is dead, the shell keeps its beautiful and shiny exterior. The thin, translucent shells are often used in jewelry, and when strung together can sound like bells,...Read more
Dec 18, 2015
Credit:

Copyright © Alexander Semenov

This is a tree topper unlike any other! Reminiscent of a freshly made snow angel, these pteropods are actually shell-less sea snails ( Clione limacina ). Unlike the typical snail, they flap their adapted foot ‘wings’ to get around in the water column. They are extremely small, with the largest species reaching only 5 centimeters long. Sea angels' mostly eat their relatives, the sea butterflies ,...Read more
Dec 16, 2015
Follow a journey with satellite tags placed on bull sharks and tarpon. Both of these large predatory fish are found in coastal in-shore ecosystems and the two species have similar diets. If given the opportunity, bull sharks will catch and consume tarpon. However, it remains unknown if tarpon adjust their movements to avoid being killed by the sharks. Using the information gained by the satellite...Read more
Dec 15, 2015
Credit:

Dietmar Temps (Flickr)

A parent Magellanic penguin ( Spheniscus magellanicus ) sits with its big chick. Magellanic penguins live in South America, breeding in colonies along the coasts of Chile, Argentina and the Falkland Islands, and some migrate north to Brazil. Parents typically lay two eggs under a bush or in a burrow, taking turns swimming out to sea to catch food for their chicks. But the largest colony in the...Read more
Dec 14, 2015
Credit:

(c) Gavin Parsons / www.gavinparsons.co.uk / Marine Photobank

There is a huge amount of plastic trash floating in the ocean, which endangers wildlife that eats or gets tangled in it. Reducing the amount of plastic trash in the ocean doesn't seem that hard; people just need to use less plastic, such as packaging, drinking straws and plastic bags. But it can be very hard to break people's habits. In 2002, Ireland made a simple change: they started charging a...Read more
Dec 11, 2015
Sponges are animals that eat tiny food particles as they pump water through their bodies. They are very common on Caribbean coral reefs, and come in all shapes, sizes and colors. There is great variability in their size: some sponges are very small (just a few centimeters) while others are very big, like the giant barrel sponge, which can be six feet wide. Even sponges of the same species can...Read more
Dec 10, 2015
Credit:

Kate Sutherland, seabirding.com

One of the smallest shearwaters in the Atlantic, Audubon's Shearwater ( Puffinus lherminieri ) is about the size of an American Robin. They breed on small islands in the Carribbean, and commonly forage around the floating Sargassum endemic to the North Atlantic. Audubon's shearwaters prefer warm, tropical waters, so do not migrate long distances like other shearwaters; however, they are...Read more
Dec 9, 2015
Credit:

NOAA/Battle of the Atlantic Expedition

Fish swim around the wreck of the HMT Bedfordshire , an Arctic fishing trawler that was converted into an anti-submarine warship during World War II. Originally part of Great Britain's Royal Navy, it was sent to assist the United States Navy in 1941. In Spring 1942, the HMT Bedfordshire was hit by a torpedo sent from a U-boat and sunk off the coast of North Carolina, killing all 37 crewmembers...Read more
Dec 8, 2015
Credit:

Phillip Colla/Nature’s Best Photography

“As we motored around Paulet Island in a Zodiac boat, these two curious penguins waddled across an iceberg to get a closer look at us.” -- Nature's Best photographer, Phillip Colla . See more beautiful ocean photos in our slideshow of winners from the 2010 Nature's Best Ocean Views photo contest. These Adélie penguins live in Antarctica and rely on tiny crustaceans, called krill, as their main...Read more

Pages