Today's Catch

Mar 11, 2014
Credit:

HBOI

These cancer cells have been treated with discodermolide, a chemical obtained from a sponge that grows on deep-sea coral reefs. It prevents the cells from dividing and spreading. Learn more about deep-sea corals in the multimedia feature " Coral Gardens of the Deep Sea " and about drugs from sea creatures in our conversation with Dr. Shirley Pomponi .Read more
Mar 10, 2014
Credit:

©2003 MBARI

Riftia tubeworm ( Riftia pachyptila ) colonies grow where hot, mineral-laden water flows out of the seafloor in undersea hot springs—such as the Guymas Basin of the Gulf of California at 2,000 meters (6562 feet), where MBARI took this photo. As volcanic activity deep below the seafloor changes, sometimes these hot springs stop flowing. In this case, the entire worm colony may die off. But new hot...Read more
Mar 7, 2014
Credit:

© John Weller

Standing at twice the height of the Adélie penguins, emperor penguins are the largest of the penguin species and can grow to be 100 pounds. This species breeds directly on the ice: a female lays her one egg and then passes it to the male to protect while she returns to the cold water to forage for food. See more photos from Antarctica's Ross Sea in our slideshow .Read more
Mar 6, 2014
Credit:

© Brian Skerry, www.brianskerry.com

The shortfin mako shark ( Isurus oxyrinchus) is found offshore in tropical and warm temperate waters of all oceans, but has been known to travel to cooler waters at times. It is very strong and the fastest known species of shark, reaching moving speeds of 31 mph (50 kph) with bursts up to 46 mph! These qualities make the shortfin mako a prized catch among recreational fisherman. The mako is also...Read more
Mar 5, 2014
Credit:

Stacy Jupiter

Giant clams are one of the many wonders of coral reefs. They can grow up to five feet wide, weigh over 400 pounds, and live for 100 years! They power all that bulk by filter feeding microbes and particles from the water, siphoning hundreds of gallons of water per day. Like corals, they also have a symbiotic relationship with photosynthetic algae called zooxanthellae that live in the fleshy part...Read more
Mar 4, 2014
Credit:

David Shale/MAR-ECO, Census of Marine Life

This beautiful jewel squid ( Histioteuthis bonnellii ) can be found swimming above the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, at depths of 500-2,000 meters (1,640-6,562 feet). The “jewels” covering the body are bioluminescent photophores. But these squids can't bargain for their lives with those jewels: they have been found in the stomachs of sperm whales, swordfish and sharks.Read more
Mar 3, 2014
Credit:

Mark Rosenstein, Flickr

The toothy goby or common ghost goby ( Pleurosicya mossambica ) lives among soft corals and sponges in the Indo-Pacific ocean. The relationship it has with its host is commensal , which means the goby benefits from the protection and habitat in the corals, but the coral doesn't get hurt or benefit from the relationship. Many of the other 2000 or so species of gobies form such symbiotic...Read more
Feb 28, 2014
Credit:

Chuck Savall

Munch, munch. The queen parrotfish ( Scarus vetula ) scrapes algae from Caribbean coral reefs with its parrot-like beak. While feeding, hard stone and coral inevitably get mixed into its lunch, which in turn gets ground up by the fish and deposited back into the ecosystem as sand. This fish is an adult male. But when young, parrotfish have the ability to change sex, depending on the population’s...Read more
Feb 27, 2014
Credit:

Alan D. Wilson

The polar bear ( Ursus maritimus ) is found in the Arctic and classified as a vulnerable species by the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. This marine mammal can swim more than 30 miles when sea ice has receded due to warm temperatures. Listen to a podcast from Encyclopedia of Life that tells the story of two personal encounters with a polar bear.Read more
Feb 26, 2014
Credit:

Smithsonian Institution

Researchers with the Smithsonian's Deep Reef Observation Project (DROP) collected this sea toad, Chaunax pictus , off the coast of Honduras in 2011. The team is trying to collect sea toads from around the Caribbean to better understand the group's genetic diversity and distribution. You can see videos and read about the DROP team's other explorations on the " Summer in a Sub " blog series.Read more

Pages