Today's Catch

Jan 26, 2010
Credit:

Wolcott Henry

This coral reef in the Western Pacific Ocean was killed by human input of silt and sand from nearby islands reaching the coral reef habitat. More about coral reef ecosystems can be found in our Coral Reefs featured story .Read more
Jan 26, 2010
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A. Fifis, Ifremer/ChEss, Census of Marine Life

The yeti crab ( Kiwa hirsuta ), an unusual, hairy crab with no eyes, was discovered in 2005 on a hydrothermal vent near Easter Island. It represents not only a new species but also a new genus— Kiwa , after the mythological Polynesian goddess of shellfish. Learn more about the Census of Marine Life and see other species found during this 10-year project.Read more
Jan 26, 2010
Credit:

Smithsonian Institution

Oceanographers divide the ocean into three broad zones. Together, they could hide 20 Washington Monuments stacked on top of each other. Each zone has a different mix of species adapted to its light levels, pressures, and temperatures. About three-fourths of the ocean is deep, permanently dark, and cold. Learn more about these different zones .Read more
Jan 26, 2010
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Kimbra Cutlip/Smithsonian Institution

How do plants respond to rising CO2 levels? To find out, plant physiologist Bert Drake at SERC exposed marsh plants near the Chesapeake Bay to CO2 levels expected in 50 and 100 years. Different species and ecosystems respond differently—leaving uncertainty about the ability of plants to act as effective buffers against increases in atmospheric CO2. Learn more about Dr. Drake’s long-running field...Read more
Jan 26, 2010
Credit:

Marsh Youngbluth/MAR-ECO, Census of Marine Life

This transparent cockatoo squid ( Leachia sp.), also known as a glass squid, lives in the depths of the ocean and has many adaptations to help it survive there. It retains ammonia solutions inside its body that give it a balloon-like shape and help it float. It has large eyes and pigment-filled cells, or chromatophores , that look like polka dots and serve as camouflage. See more pictures of...Read more
Jan 26, 2010
Credit:

Charles Fisher, Ridge 2000 Program/ChEss, Census of Marine Life

Flower-like zoanthids, relatives of coral, carpet a hydrothermal vent. This species of zoanthid is the first ever discovered at a hydrothermal vent. See more pictures of incredible deep sea diversity at our slideshow!Read more
Jan 26, 2010
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Jan 26, 2010
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Amos Nachoum 2005/Marine Photobank

A diver cares for the reef by cleaning up discarded fishing gear and garbage. Even if you don't have scuba gear, you can help protect the ocean and coral reefs !Read more
Jan 26, 2010
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Dana Yoerger/Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Geophysicist Jian Lin of Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and chief U.S. scientist aboard the Chinese oceanographic ship DaYang Yihao studied the earthquake site that triggered 2004’s Indian Ocean tsunami. Read an interview with Dr. Lin in Oceanus magazine . Learn about earthquake forecasting in Dr. Lin’s article “Earthshaking Events” .Read more
Jan 26, 2010
Credit:

Smithsonian Institution

From the water, red mangroves appear to form an impenetrable tangle of roots, trunks, and leaves—a protective barrier against storms and tsunamis. More about mangroves can be found in our Mangroves featured story .Read more

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