Today's Catch

May 22, 2014
Credit:

Antoine N'Yeurt, Moorea Biocode Project

A strain of this green seaweed, native to the Indian and Pacific Oceans, escaped public and private aquariums in California, Japan, Australia, and Monaco. It has spread widely in the Mediterranean, replacing native plants (such as seagrasses ) and depriving marine life of food and habitat. In California , it was eradicated at considerable cost using toxic chemicals. Read No Passport Required:...Read more
May 21, 2014
Credit:

© Alexander Semenov Link

Comb jellies (such as this Bolinopsis species) are named for their combs: the rows of cilia lining their bodies that propel them through the ocean. Read more about jellyfish and comb jellies .Read more
May 20, 2014
Credit:

Brian Skerry

"Wild manatees in Belize are not used to humans. Living miles offshore in mangroves, they remain shy and elusive. After weeks searching and waiting for an opportunity to photograph them, I was rewarded with an especially tolerant mother and calf. I approached quietly, watching the mother create billowing clouds of silt as she fed on seagrass. I positioned myself so the light was perfect and...Read more
May 19, 2014
Credit:

Exploring the Inner Space of the Celebes Sea 2007 Exploration, NOAA-OE.

How many animals swim in the sea? It's not easy to count them all. To get a feel for the ocean's diversity, scientists, such as those involved in the Census of Marine Life , sail out on research cruises to collect and count as many animals as they can find! Shown here is a sample of zooplankton collected in a trawl net with a 10-meter-square opening, including a jellyfish, a lanternfish, a snipe...Read more
May 16, 2014
Credit:

From Verrill, A.E., 1882, Report on the Cephalopods of the Northeastern Coast of America

This 1874 photo of a squid draped over a bathtub was the first ever taken of a giant squid. It belonged to the Reverend Moses Harvey of Newfoundland. More about the giant squid can be found in the Giant Squid section .Read more
May 15, 2014
Credit:

Bryce Flynn/Nature’s Best Photography

“This humpback uses its lower jaw to strain fish off the water’s surface as sea birds snatch their own meals right out of the whale’s open mouth.” -- Nature's Best photographer, Bryce Flynn. See more beautiful ocean photos in our slideshow of winners from the 2010 Nature's Best Ocean Views photo contest.Read more
May 14, 2014
Credit:

L. Madin, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (www.cmarz.org)

This colony of Rosacea may look like a single jellyfish, but it is actually a large group of smaller siphonophores clustered and living together. In fact, the zooids (individual siphonophores living in the colony) cannot survive on their own. This specimen was photographed by the Census of Marine Zooplankton , a project of the Census of Marine Life , in the Sargasso Sea in April 2006. A Rosacea...Read more
May 13, 2014
Credit:

Tobias Friedrich/Nature's Best Photography

Gobies make up the largest family ( Gobiidae ) of fishes in the world, with over 2,000 species. In this large family you can also find the smallest fish. The gobies in this photo are about one inch long (2.5 cm), and most in the family are less than four inches. Because of their small size gobies must work to evade their many predators, often through burrowing or special mutualistic relationships...Read more
May 12, 2014
Credit:Photo courtesy of CARTHE
Researchers launch one-meter-tall plastic drifters into the Gulf of Mexico in 2012. Over 300 of these drifters were released and their location information was sent to researchers every five minutes through GPS satellite. This project from the Consortium for Advanced Research on Transport of Hydrocarbon in the Environment, or CARTHE, called the Grand LAgrangian Deployment (GLAD) received 5.7...Read more
May 9, 2014
Credit:

Artie Copleman, Flickr

'Austral' or southern breeders, Great Shearwaters ( Ardenna gravis ) migrate from breeding islands far to the south in the Atlantic before traveling to the Northern Atlantic to feed. This trip is 6,000 miles each way and, if they're lucky, great shearwaters will complete this round trip every year for a 60-year lifetime. See photos and read more about seabird migration.Read more

Pages