Catherine

Catherine Sutera joined the Smithsonian as an Assistant Ocean Science Educator at the National Museum of Natural History. She is now an Education Interpreter at South Carolina Aquarium. Catherine has a Master’s in Natural Science from Louisiana State University where she did her thesis on the impact of informal science education. She also did her undergraduate work at LSU, majoring in biology, with a marine biology concentration. Before coming to the Smithsonian, Catherine was a graduate assistant with the Louisiana Sea Grant office where she developed informal educational materials and helped organize a day-long ocean education event for K-8 students. She has also worked with the Audubon Zoo, the LSU Museum of Natural History, and the Bluebonnet Swamp Nature Center. Catherine has also participated in field research, spending a summer with the Marine Biological Laboratory in Plum Island Watershed in Massachusetts.

Palmer Station Antarctica (LTER)

Palmer Station is a site for long term ecological research in Antarctica; Access their education activities to learn all about the station and the research being conducted there.

Rutgers Antarctic Summer

Join two scientists on their journey to Antarctic. Learn about the ship needed to travel to the coldest place in the world, as well as the Palmer Station where they conducted their research. There is a slide show of the...

Deep Earth Academy: Arctic Ocean Scientific Drilling

Deep Earth Academy, a program from the Consortium for Ocean Leadership, has many lesson plans and curricula about scientific ocean drilling. Many of the plans are inquiry-based and data driven, and draw from field...

Penguin TV: Ocean Drilling for Kids

Watch this short video starring “penguins” that explains Scientific Drilling in the Antarctic. Then read about the recent (January – March 2010) expedition that studied the Antarctica ice sheet. In addition you can access...

Jelly Critters: Gelatinous zooplankton

In this activity, students will be able to compare and contrast at least three different groups of organisms that are included in ‘gelatinous zooplankton’, describe how gelatinous zooplankton fit into marine food webs, and...

Where Have All the Glaciers Gone?

Students will describe how climate change is affecting sea ice, vegetation, and glaciers in the Arctic region, explain how changes in the Arctic climate can produce global impacts, and will be able to provide three examples...

Burp Under the Ice

In this activity, students will be able to identify the natural processes that produce methane, describe where methane deposits are located in the Arctic region, explain how warmer climates may affect Arctic methane deposits...

Trophic relationships in Arctic marine ecosystems

In this activity, students will be able to describe how ratios of stable nitrogen isotopes can be used to study trophic relationships between marine organisms, make inferences about trophic relationships between organisms...

Benthic Communities of the Arctic Ocean

In this activity, students will be able to identify major taxa that are dominant in deep benthic communities of the Arctic Ocean. Given distribution data for major taxa in different Arctic benthic communities, students will...

Just Jelly: ecological role of gelatinous zooplankton

In this activity, students will be able to compare and contrast the feeding strategies of at least three different types of gelatinous zooplankton, and explain why gelatinous zooplankton may function at several trophic...

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