Hannah Waters

One of Hannah Waters's earliest memories is digging up sand crabs on a Delaware beach, and she hasn't stopped digging the ocean. Formerly a writer, editor and producer for the Ocean Portal at the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History, she is currently an associate web editor at Audubon.org. She studied Biology and Latin Minnesota’s Carleton College, sneaking off to the coasts in the summertime to study seabird colonies, conserve endangered piping plovers, and help lobstermen with their traps. She loves cephalopods, imagining plankton as larger-than-life monsters, and weird adaptations.

Reef Sharks Repelled by People

Large numbers of grey reef sharks were observed at Jarvis Island, an uninhabited Pacific island, during the 2010 Pacific RAMP expedition of the NOAA Ship Hi'ialakai . Credit: NOAA Reef sharks rarely get any love. These...

Where have all the reef sharks gone?

Reef sharks are disappearing from coral reefs, according to a new survey: less than 10% stick around when humans move in. Are they being hunted by people or are they skittish?

An Ancient Whale Skeleton, Unexcavated

Nick Pyenson, the curator of fossil marine mammals at the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History, points to the skull and skeleton of a fossil "toothed" mysticete ( baleen whale ) on the West Coast Trail of...

Nick Pyenson Digs for Fossils in 2012

Nick Pyenson, the Smithsonian Natural History Museum's curator of marine mammal fossils, is back in the field excavating a fossil whale in Canada. What's special about this fossil is that it's the ancient ancestor of a...

Sponge-Wielding Bottlenose Dolphin

A female bottlenose dolphin ( Tursiops sp. ) carries a sponge, which it uses as a tool to dig up prey from the seafloor. The only dolphins known to use sponges as tools this way are the female members of a small group that...

Cardinalfish Dad with a Mouthful of Eggs

Cardinalfish ( Cheilodipterus sp. ) dads do their part to protect their eggs by gingerly carrying them in their mouths. However, the dads could easily swallow the whole bunch in one gulp! To keep her eggs alive, the...

Clownfish in their Host Anemone

Two bright orange anemonefish ( Amphiprion ocellaris ) poke their heads between anemone tentacles. Anemonefish are able to swim amongst the stinging tentacles without getting stung — but no one knows exactly sure how. One...

Elephant Seals Tussle for Territory

Male northern elephant seals face off on the beach by vocalizing through their extended noses, called proboscises. Every winter, when the seals return to the beach where they were born to breed, males arrive first to tussle...

Fossils Get a CT Scan

When paleontologists, like the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History's own Nick Pyenson , curator of marine mammal fossils, dig up fossils in the field, they can't just toss them in their backpacks and carry them...

Dancing for the Oceans

Video of OCEAN: Out Of The Blue If you were choreographing a dance about the ocean, how would you do it? Would you dart around like a lobster in a hurry? Dive like a dolphin? Float like a jellyfish? Choreographer Fran...

Out of the Blue, an Oceans Dance

Ocean , a dance choreographed by Fran Spector Atkins, combines interpretive dance with scientist interviews, photography, and ocean facts to spread a message of ocean conservation -- a "balanced message that inspires and...

The Food Web, Through Dance

Three dancers demonstrate the food web in the production Ocean , which blends dance with scientist interviews, facts, and ocean photography. The choreographer, Fran Spector Atkins, hopes dance will help her message of ocean...

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