Hannah Waters

One of Hannah Waters's earliest memories is digging up sand crabs on a Delaware beach, and she hasn't stopped digging the ocean. Formerly a writer, editor and producer for the Ocean Portal at the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History, she is currently an associate web editor at Audubon.org. She studied Biology and Latin Minnesota’s Carleton College, sneaking off to the coasts in the summertime to study seabird colonies, conserve endangered piping plovers, and help lobstermen with their traps. She loves cephalopods, imagining plankton as larger-than-life monsters, and weird adaptations.

Biodiversity in the Coastal Zone

The Natural Geography In Shore Areas (NaGISA) project, a part of the Census of Marine Life , aimed to determine what organisms live in coastal zones around the world. Its name, nagisa , is the Japanese word for the narrow...

Elephant Seals Laze on the Beach

These southern elephant seals ( Mirounga leonina ) may look like beach bums, but when they are in the water hunting, they are anything but. Satellite tracking by tagging the animals has found that, during the 10 months they...

Kelp Pennant

"Fronds of giant kelp, buoyed by their gas-filled pneumatocysts, wave like pennants in the current of Monterey Bay, California," wrote George Cathcart of his image , a winning selection in the Portraits of Planet Ocean...

Kelp Forests - NaGISA

Kelp forests, also known as rocky macroalgal ecosystems, were one of the two main ecosystems studied by NaGISA. The dense stands of kelp, stretching from the seafloor to the surface, are home to much biodiversity.

An Invasive Brittlestar

These brittlestars ( Ophiothela mirabilis ) are not where they belong. These animals, usually found in the Pacific Ocean, were first spotted in the Atlantic Ocean off the coast of Brazil in 2000. And since then, they've been...

CMarZ Slideshows

Want to see more photos of cool zooplankton collected by CMarZ? Check out the following galleries produced by the researchers: New species Southeastern Atlantic Sargasso Sea Northwest Australia Life at Sea

Close-up View of Salps

This close-up view of salps, which have aggregated together into a long chain, have brilliant red guts from eating red plankton. They were observed by researchers with the Census of Marine Zooplankton in the Sargasso Sea...

A Swimming Snail

Sea butterflies (also called pteropods) are sea snails aptly named: they are shelled marine snails, each with a foot like a wing, that swim in the water column like butterflies. This one, Atlanta peronii , is very small: the...

Amphipod: Salp Invader

Can you spot the amphipod ( Phronima atlantica ) in the below photo? She's the transparent lobster-looking animal in the middle, surrounded by her own eggs -- inside a sac that once was the "barrel" of a salp. Mothers in the...

The Great Hermit Crab Migration

A Caribbean hermit crab (Coenobita clypeatus) crawls on the forest floor. Credit: Flickr user Island Conservation Over the last few days, a video of hermit crabs stampeding across the rocky shores of St. John in the U.S...

Hermit Crab Migration

At the end of each summer, thousands of Caribbean hermit crabs crawl ( Coenobita clypeatus ) from the forest to the sea, and back again.

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