Tina Tennessen

Tina Tennessen has a background in radio journalism and loves hearing a good story. She is a science writer, web editor, and a former radio producer. Before joining the National Museum of Natural History team in early 2011, she held the position of Public Affairs Officer at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center (SERC) in Edgewater, Md. While at SERC, Tina created and edited a news blog called Shorelines and publicized Smithsonian research and educational programs, generating press coverage and public attention for issues such as ocean acidification, hypoxia, invasive species, sea-level rise, shoreline development, and over-fishing. Tina grew up near five of Minnesota's 10,000 lakes and feels fortunate to be working among marine scientists who have dedicated their lives to understanding the underwater realm and the issues that affect it.

The Plastiki Sailboat

A still from, Voyage of the Plastiki , part of the 19th Annual Environmental Film Festival in the Nation's Capital.

Chesapeake Boat Painting

A still from The Last Boat Out , part of the 19th Annual Environmental Film Festival in the Nation's Capital.

Albatross Soars

A still from Albatrocity , part of the 19th Annual Environmental Film Festival in the Nation's Capital.

Carteret Islands Row

A still from Sun Come Up , part of the 19th Annual Environmental Film Festival in the Nation's Capital.

The Coral Gardener

When coral reefs are damaged, they sometimes struggle to grow back because there aren't enough coral seedlings around, and the ones that are around are growing together too closely. Enter: the coral gardeners. Fiji's coral...

Jellyfish Floating

A still from Journey of the Universe , part of the 19th Annual Environmental Film Festival in the Nation's Capital.

Dennis Whigham

Dennis Whigham, Senior Botanist, Smithsonian Environmental Research Center

Make Me Care About: Phragmites (Video)

Dennis Whigham , a senior botanist at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center , makes his quick pitch for why you should care about the wetland plant Phragmites australis . A European strain of phragmites has...

Phragmites australis

An invasive strain of the plant Phragmites australis dominates this Chesapeake Bay wetland. The plant can easily grow up to 3 meters (9.8 feet) tall and alter coastal ecosystems. Scientists at the Smithsonian Environmental...

Make Me Care About: Phragmites

Dennis Whigham , a senior botanist at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center , makes his quick pitch for why you should care about the wetland plant Phragmites australis . A European strain of phragmites has...

Phragmites australis, seeds

The invasive reed Phragmites australis can create new plants through seeds (shown here) or underground rhizomes. Scientists at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center have discovered that seeds are the primary method...

Corals Threatened by Acid Seas

Much of the carbon dioxide we emit into the atmosphere ends up in the ocean. As CO 2 levels rise, seawater becomes more acidic. This change in chemistry poses a serious threat to marine organisms including snails, corals ,...

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