Maggy Hunter Benson

Maggy Benson manages both distance learning and community partnerships in the Office of Education and Outreach at the National Museum of Natural History. She manages the implementation of the NMNH distance learning program, which pioneers new models for using digital media and technology to engage youth audiences who cannot access the Museum. As a partnership manager, Maggy oversees the building and maintenance of relationships with schools, school districts, professional associations, government agencies, and non-profit organizations locally and nationally. Prior to this position, she was the community manager and producer for the Webby Award-winning Smithsonian Ocean Portal.

Prior to her work at Smithsonian, Maggy was the coordinator of Coastal America’s Learning Center Network, implementing international ocean science activities and programs such as the International Student Summit on Oceans and Coasts and the International Ocean art Contest, in partnership with aquariums, federal agencies, and corporations.

Maggy enjoys spending her time cycling through Washington, DC and occasionally slipping away to the coast to swim, surf, and dive.

Ocean Trash Plaguing Our Sea

Garbage patches in the ocean aren't piled-up islands of trash and debris, as is the common perception. But that doesn't mean the tiny, swirling plastic bits are nothing to worry about. The currents of the North Pacific gyre...

Scientists Use Bioacoustics to Protect Marine Mammals

Marine mammals such as whales, dolphins, and seals have an amazing ability to hold their breaths—sometimes for up to two hours—while they dive deep to search for food and evade predators. In the cold, dark waters hundreds of...

Climate Change at the Poles

Polar bears are threatened by the loss of sea ice in the Arctic. Credit: K. Elliott, NOAA, Hidden Ocean 2005 At the ends of the Earth, life thrives despite extreme conditions. In the Arctic and Southern Oceans, organisms...

Bring Your Own Container to Avoid Trash

More than ever, the fate of the ocean is in our hands. To be good stewards and leave a thriving ocean for future generations, we need to make changes big and small wherever we are. To make a positive difference, here are...

Check the Pressure

Keeping your car tires properly inflated can trim your carbon footprint, reduce wear and tear on your vehicle, and save yourself some cash at the same time. In fact, the U.S. Department of Energy estimates that underinflated...

Flip the Switch

Many household electronics, such as video game consoles, stereos, computers, and kitchen appliances, continue drawing power after they are switched off. The U.S. Department of Energy estimates that this “phantom” energy use...

Clean-up Your Act

Even if you don't live near the coast, water—and anything else—that goes down your drain can eventually end up in the ocean. You can help keep the ocean and other waterways healthy by picking your cleaning products carefully...

Be a Picky Eater

When it comes to many of our once-favorite seafoods, there aren't always plenty more fish in the sea. In fact, some studies estimate that up to 90 percent of large predatory fish (those that eat other animals—and usually end...

Oil on the Water

Major oil spills like the 2010 Deepwater Horizon spill are devestating, but aren’t the only way oil gets into the ocean. Nearly 85 percent of oil in U.S. coastal waters comes from runoff (roads, parking lots, etc.), polluted...

Teens Making a Difference in Your Community

The North Carolina Aquarium delegation visited Baldhead Island, a barrier island near Wilmington, N.C., to observe and learn about the effects sea-level rise firsthand for their Student Summit project. Over the past year I...

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