Archaeologists Investigate an Early Whaling Community

For over a decade, Smithsonian Arctic Archaeologist, William Fitzhugh, has been investigating an early European whaling site at Hare Harbor in Québec, Canada. The site and the artifacts recovered here have revealed information about the contact and trading relationships between Inuit peoples of Northern Canada and the European Basque whalers of France and Spain.

Learn more about the Smithsonian's archeological site investigation at Hare Harbor and the Arctic Studies Center's research expeditions in the St. Lawrence region.

A map of the early European whaling site at Hare Harbor in Quebec, Canada
The excavation site of an Inuit home in Hare Harbor, Quebec, CanadaA fragment of European ballamine ceramic that was excavated at Hare Harbor in Quebec, Canada in 2011Map depicting the archaeological excavation site at Hare Harbor in Quebec, Canada in 2009two men each hold a ceramic vessel at the archaeological exA diagram of the different soil layers located at Hare Harbor, Quebec in 2008.  Wood chips were located at the deepest layer, then whale bone, then codfish bones.A researcher holds a maritime archaic point made of ramah chert that was found at Hare Harbor in Quebec, Canada in 2011A point made of Ramah Chert that belonged to the early Eskimo group known as the Groswater Dorseta seven inch fragment of an Inuit soapstone pot recovered at Hare Harbor in Quebec, Canada